Category Archives: Upper Coquille

Bracken Fern

Whenever they lived near the mouth of the river, in the bay, they had lots of food.      They had dried salmon,  and likewise (dried) fern roots, which they ate during the winter.              They … Continue reading

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Wild Gooseberries

Tillamook: tasdík’us Hanis Coos: tax’wái, dɪlxáxa Upper Coquille: naltan Gooseberries and currants all belong to the genus Ribes. As a general rule, the difference between currants and gooseberries is that currant bushes tend to not be thorny, but gooseberry bushes … Continue reading

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Black Huckleberries

Chinook Jargon: shot ‘úlalɪ Tillamook: sdzadzách’ Alsea: ɫkáq’a Siuslaw: táxxai, ch’eixan Hanis Coos: q’áxas (black); pasásɪya’wa (blue colored berries) Milluk Coos: q’as Upper Coquille: dashtl’æchuh The coastal black huckleberry, Vaccinium ovatum, were (and are) a popular food for Oregon coast … Continue reading

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Blackberries

Tillamook: berry kɪ nux; vines kɪnnúwɪx Alsea: ɫa’qat Siuslaw/Lower Umpqua:  ts’xát’aat’ Hanis Coos: berry wixaini, vines yaxdaná’aɫ  Milluk:  dzudzua Upper Coquille: daddzænnæs The native trailing blackberry is a tasty berry, ripe in July.  People seek them out today to make delicious pies … Continue reading

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Red Elderberries

Red elderberries, Sambucus racemosa, is one of several elderberry species in North America (other species having blue or black berries) and are in the honeysuckle family, Caprifoliaceae. Hanis Coos: mahá’wai Milluk Coos: txai Upper Coquille: ránsæ Tillamook: húkitu=the berries; húkitáwi=the bush … Continue reading

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Sweet Grass

The sweet grass that is best known, and used by many Plains and Plateau tribes in prayers, is a species known as Hierachloë odorata. In western Oregon, the usual species of sweet grass is a close relative known as H. occidentalis.  Inland … Continue reading

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Harvest lily (Brodiaea coronaria)

In western North America, there are several harvest lilies in the general Brodiaea and Dichelostema.  In Coos county, Brodiaea coronaria and B. terrestris can be found.  Near the Siuslaw river, Dichelostema capitatum can be found.  Several of these species have edible bulbs and were traditional … Continue reading

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Salmonberry

We found a few early blooming salmonberries last month on Bolon Island (near Reedsport).  Spring time was when Native women would go out and collect the new growth, the young green sprouts of Salmon berry (Rubus spectabilis) as well as … Continue reading

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Licorice Fern

I got to visit Oregon last week.  While there, daughter & I went on a short hike on Bolon Island.  The Bolon Island trail is easy to miss – the turn off isn’t marked.  On Highway 101, the bridge between … Continue reading

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A quick blog link about camas…

I’m sure anyone who’s ever ready anything about Northwestern Indians has run across stories about camas – it is a well known staple food that was prized by many tribes. In Oregon there are several species of camas (in the … Continue reading

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